Cybersecurity Tensions Rise During President Biden’s First 100 Days

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Cyber threats are a fact of life for nations and companies around the world. The United States government has recognized and addressed the growing risk of cyber attacks from adversaries dating back to at least 2001, when President George Bush appointed Richard Clarke as the first Cybersecurity Czar—a special adviser to the president on issues of computer security. A lot has changed since 2001—both in terms of the technology attack surface and the threat landscape—and cyberattacks have emerged as the primary battlefield in a new “Cold War” between the United States and its primary adversaries. In March, a panel of experts got together for a virtual roundtable titled “Restoring National Cybersecurity: A Look into the First 100 Days of the New Administration” to discuss the challenges we face and offer guidance for how to address them effectively.

We are nearing the end of President Joe Biden’s first 100 days in office. The first 100 days is generally recognized as a combination of honeymoon phase—as cabinet positions are filled, and individuals get acquainted with their roles and ramped up on the work to be done—as well as a significant milestone—as the nation considers the early tenor and vision of the policies being pursued by the new president. The job of President of the United States is never easy, but President Biden’s challenges were compounded by inheriting the fallout of gross negligence and incompetence by the former administration on virtually every front—from the economy, to foreign relations, to the climate, to education and infrastructure, to the urgent need to implement a functional plan for dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic and expediting vaccinations across the country. On top of all of that, the nation is facing a large and growing cyber threat from adversary nation-states and cybercriminals that can’t be ignored.

The roundtable discussion was hosted by Cybereason and moderated by David Spark. The…

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