T-Mobile customers are left feeling frustrated as hacker comes forward, calling the company’s security ‘awful’

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360




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  • An American man living in Turkey claims to be the hacker behind a massive T-Mobile breach, the Wall Street Journal reported.
  • T-Mobile customers are left feeling frustrated by their wireless carrier over security concerns.
  • Customers are experiencing fraudulent charges on debit cards and spam calls and text messages after the breach.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

T-Mobile customers are dealing with the fallout of a security breach that exposed the personal information of more than 53 million people, with some telling Insider they’ve recently experienced fraudulent charges on debit cards and spam calls and text messages.

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Customers also expressed frustration that the man who took responsibility for the attack said it was easy.

“Their security is awful,” John Binns, a 21-year-old American who now lives in Turkey, told The Wall Street Journal on Friday, claiming to be the hacker behind the breach.

Binns gained access to the servers after discovering an unprotected router by scanning T-Mobile’s internet address for weak spots, The Journal reported. Over 53 million people had personal information compromised in the hack such as names, addresses, dates of births, phone numbers, Social Security numbers, and driver’s license information.

Many customers are now dealing with the repercussions of the hack and feel as though T-Mobile is not doing enough to protect them as some information hits the dark web.

Eddie Richards, a T-Mobile customer from Elizabethtown, Kentucky, told Insider he did not know about the hack until it reached the news. Richards is part of T-Mobile’s family plan, and while only the primary account holder was notified of the data breach by the company, he believes that all customers should have been made aware.

“It just frustrates me, honestly,” Richards said. “If our data is a priority for you guys to keep safe, how come I haven’t gotten a notification or anything like that?”

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The telecom company has previously said that no financial information was compromised in the breach, but…

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