T-Mobile hacker who stole data on 50million customers: ‘Their security is awful’

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


John Binns, a 21-year-old American who moved to Turkey a few years ago, told The Wall Street Journal he was behind the security breach. Mr. Binns, who since 2017 has used several online aliases, communicated with the Journal in Telegram messages from an account that discussed details of the hack before they were widely known.

The August intrusion was the latest in a string of high-profile breaches at U.S. companies that have allowed thieves to walk away with troves of personal details on consumers. A booming industry of cybersecurity consultants, software suppliers and incident-response teams have so far failed to turn the tide against hackers and identity thieves who fuel their businesses by tapping these deep reservoirs of stolen corporate data.

The breach is the third major customer data leak that T-Mobile has disclosed in the past two years. The Bellevue, Wash., company is the second-largest U.S. mobile carrier with roughly 90 million cellphones connecting to its networks.

The Seattle office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating the T-Mobile hack, according to a person familiar with the matter. “The FBI is aware of the incident and does not have any additional information at this time,” the Seattle office said in a statement Wednesday.

In messages with the Journal, Mr. Binns said he managed to pierce T-Mobile’s defenses after discovering in July an unprotected router exposed on the internet. He said he had been scanning T-Mobile’s known internet addresses for weak spots using a simple tool available to the public.

The young hacker said he did it to gain attention. “Generating noise was one goal,” he wrote. He declined to say whether he had sold any of the stolen data or whether he was paid to breach T-Mobile.

Several cybersecurity experts said the public details of the hack and reports of previous T-Mobile breaches show the carrier’s defenses need improvement. Many of the records reported stolen were from prospective clients or former customers long gone. “That to me does not sound like good data management practices,” said Glenn Gerstell, a former general counsel for…

Source…