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ASSA ABLOY Helps Organizations To Adopt Mobile Access Control

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The smartphone is changing access control and security management at every scale and level, from global corporations to small companies. Making the switch to mobile access control, however, can seem daunting. Questions may arise around cost, practicality and the potential need for new door hardware. Yet going mobile is actually a lot simpler and quicker than many think, as one new guide explains.

Data from the recent Wireless Access Control Report 2021 suggests almost two-thirds of organizations have already adopted mobile access control, or plan to do so within two years. Industry analysts Omdia estimate that downloads of mobile credentials grew by 220% between 2018 and 2019 alone.

Mobile access control

The main benefits of mobile access control, the report suggests, are convenience, cost and security. All three of these advantages apply for any scale of organization. The user convenience of replacing plastic key-cards with secure ‘mobile keys’ on a smartphone is obvious. Identical benefits have already brought a mobile-first ethos to banking, travel booking, food delivery and many more sectors.

The ability to get the job done efficiently from anywhere is becoming essential

From a business perspective, too, the option for facilities managers to use their own smart device to issue, amend or revoke an employee’s mobile key brings added flexibility. It frees security staff from the desk and its dedicated admin PC. As the work patterns become fluid — IBM estimates 1.87 billion people will be mobile workers by 2022 — the ability to get the job done efficiently from anywhere is becoming essential. Access management via smartphone offers this.

Reissuing mobile credential

Secondly, mobile credentials are simpler and quicker to administer than key-cards, which brings significant cost savings. Deploying mobile keys on employee smartphones removes any need to purchase plastic cards or pay for their printing. Any missing plastic credential needs replacing; canceling and reissuing a mobile credential is essentially costless. Mobile access control also enables a business to reduce its use of non-recyclable plastics.

Third, the…

Source…

Enterprises that wait to adopt a mobile-first strategy set to fail, report finds – GlobeNewswire

Enterprises that wait to adopt a mobile-first strategy set to fail, report finds  GlobeNewswire
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Advocacy group calls on health-care industry to adopt medical device security principles

Advocacy group I Am the Cavalry is urging organizations that manufacture and distribute medical devices to adopt a cybersecurity version of the Hippocratic Oath.

The group, which advocates for better security in life-impacting computers like those used in modern cars, medical devices or critical infrastructure, has published an open letter to the health-care industry, calling for a commitment to five principles when creating, using and maintaining medical devices.

Those principles are security by design, collaboration with security researchers, ensuring that evidence of potential failures is captured and preserved for later analysis, safeguarding critical elements under the assumption that they’ll operate in adverse conditions and providing easy-to-install security updates.

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Network World Security

Cybercriminals adopt recently patched zero-day exploit in a flash

Just four days after Adobe Systems patched a vulnerability in Flash Player, the exploit was adopted by cybercriminals for use in large-scale attacks. This highlights the increasingly small time frame users have to deploy patches.

On Saturday, a malware researcher known online as Kafeine spotted a drive-by download attack done with the Magnitude exploit kit that was exploiting a Flash Player vulnerability patched Tuesday.

The flaw, tracked as CVE-2015-3113 in the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures database, had zero-day status—that is, it was previously unpatched—when Adobe released a patch for it. It had already been exploited by a China-based cyberespionage group for several weeks in targeted attacks against organizations from the aerospace, defense, construction, engineering, technology, telecommunications and transportation industries.

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Network World Security