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Computer vision can help spot cyber threats with startling accuracy

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


This article is part of our reviews of AI research papers, a series of posts that explore the latest findings in artificial intelligence.

The last decade’s growing interest in deep learning was triggered by the proven capacity of neural networks in computer vision tasks. If you train a neural network with enough labeled photos of cats and dogs, it will be able to find recurring patterns in each category and classify unseen images with decent accuracy.

What else can you do with an image classifier?

In 2019, a group of cybersecurity researchers wondered if they could treat security threat detection as an image classification problem. Their intuition proved to be well-placed, and they were able to create a machine learning model that could detect malware based on images created from the content of application files. A year later, the same technique was used to develop a machine learning system that detects phishing websites.

The combination of binary visualization and machine learning is a powerful technique that can provide new solutions to old problems. It is showing promise in cybersecurity, but it could also be applied to other domains.

Detecting malware with deep learning

The traditional way to detect malware is to search files for known signatures of malicious payloads. Malware detectors maintain a database of virus definitions which include opcode sequences or code snippets, and they search new files for the presence of these signatures. Unfortunately, malware developers can easily circumvent such detection methods using different techniques such as obfuscating their code or using polymorphism techniques to mutate their code at runtime.

Dynamic analysis tools try to detect malicious behavior during runtime, but they are slow and require the setup of a sandbox environment to test suspicious programs.

In recent years, researchers have also tried a range of machine learning techniques to detect malware. These ML models have managed to make progress on some of the challenges of malware detection, including code obfuscation. But they present new challenges, including the need to learn too many features and a virtual environment to analyze the target samples.

Binary visualization can…

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Defensive Cyber Weapons Market Will Hit Big Revenues In Future |

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


Defensive Cyber Weapons MArket

Defensive Cyber Weapons MArket

A Latest intelligence report published by AMA Research with title “Defensive Cyber Weapons Market Outlook to 2026. A detailed study accumulated to offer Latest insights about acute features of the Global Defensive Cyber Weapons Market. This report provides a detailed overview of key factors in the Defensive Cyber Weapons Market and factors such as driver, restraint, past and current trends, regulatory scenarios and technology development. A thorough analysis of these factors including economic slowdown, local & global reforms and COVID-19 Impact has been conducted to determine future growth prospects in the global market.

Get Free Exclusive PDF Sample Copy of This Research @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/sample-report/178638-global-defensive-cyber-weapons-market

Scope of the Report of Defensive Cyber Weapons:
Defensive cyber weapons are noxious specialists intended for insight, military, and paramilitary security or reconnaissance purposes utilized in digital fighting, and state or non-state people are largely supported and sponsored these weapons. Defensive cyber weapons are utilized to disregard the security of individuals of any country or to think twice about their sovereignty. Also, defensive cyber weapons are as infections malware that can cause or ensure against burglary of intellectual property or the destruction of information and frameworks. Defensive cyber weapons show high selectivity in both their employment and their activity. Prior to the assault, cyber weapons normally distinguish the target by distinctive methods, similarly malware utilized by fraudsters for the burglary of important data related to financials, shows lower selectivity and more extensive appropriation.

Some of the key players profiled in the study are:
AVAST Software (Prague, Czech Republic), BAE Systems (United Kingdom), Cisco Systems (United States), FireEye Inc. (United States), Airbus Group SE (France), AO Kaspersky Lab (Russia), AVG Technologies (Prague, Czech Republic), Lockheed Martin Corporation (United States), McAfee LLC (United States), Raytheon Company (United States)

Market Trends:
The government regulatory bodies and…

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Cyber Security Today, Week in Review for Sept. 17, 2021

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


I’m Jim Love, CIO of IT World Canada, sitting in today for Howard Solomon. With me to discuss some of the news is Dinah Davis, Kitchener, Ont., based-vice president of research and development and Arctic Wolf.

But first, before we get to that, a quick look at some of the headlines and the stories Howard has been covering for the past seven days:

 

Many employees working from home see cybersecurity as a hindrance, according to a survey. And they admit that they’re trying to bypass security controls. That’s one of the topics Dinah and I will discuss. Another is a report showing that password brute force or vulnerability exploitation are still leading ways organization’s environments are being compromised.

Apple users should update their devices as soon as possible because the company has issued security patches for two serious vulnerabilities. One of them was discovered by the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, and was allegedly used to compromise the devices of activist reporters. Threat actors are also using a Linux version of the Cobalt Strike hacking tool. This means IT teams with Linux infrastructure have to worry about detecting the signs of this tool before the malware gets installed. And lastly, researchers discovered an unsecured database open to the internet with 61 million records from wearable fitness devices that apparently belong to an American application developer.  That company’s website has been offline since the news broke.

(The following is an edited version of my talk with Dinah Davis. To hear the full conversation play the podcast.)

Jim: I’ve been dying to ask you one question since I’ve met you: Where did the name Arctic Wolf come from?

Dinah: We have two founders at Arctic Wolf, one based in Canada — Kim Trombley — and one based in the U. S. — Brian Naismith. At the time most of the employees were going to be in Canada. They had a few criteria for figuring out what the name could be. One was that they wanted it to start with an ”A” so that anytime things were listed alphabetically we would be at the top. They floated a few different animal names — I don’t know why, I guess they liked animals – and Arctic Wolf stuck….

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Dorries Put In Charge Of Cyber Security Despite Admitting To Sharing Passwords

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


Tory Nadine Dorries has been put in charge of beefing up Britain’s cyber security despite admitting to sharing her computer password with staff and interns in her office.

Boris Johnson ’s decision to name Ms Dorries Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport in this week’s reshuffle was a surprise to many – who may know her best as a contestant on I’m A Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here.

The bestselling author, 64, has also been under fire over a string of right-wing tweets and comments about race, culture, media and gay rights – which, to her critics, are highly offensive.

In 2013, she prompted accusations of racism when saying ex-MP Chuka Umunna looked like boxer Chris Eubank.

She’s complained that “left-wing snowflakes are killing comedy”.

And she provoked fury by retweeting comments made by far-right extremist Tommy Robinson.

As part of her job, she’ll have responsibility for improving cyber-security in the UK – but has been previously accused of failing to keep her constituents private data “confidential and secure.”

In 2017, she admitted “all my staff” had the password for her private Commons computer.

She defended her decision to tell staff and interns her password, insisting she didn’t have any sensitive information
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Image:

REUTERS)


“My staff log onto my computer on my desk with my login everyday,” she said. “Including interns on exchange programmes.”

She made the admission in a bid to defend Theresa May ’s former deputy, Damian Green, who had been accused of watching pornography on his Commons computer.

Mr Green denied the allegations.

But Ms Dorries intervened in the debate, insisting the “claim that the computer on Greens desk was accessed and therefore it was Green is utterly preposterous!!”

Ms Dorries admission came just months after Parliament had suffered a major cyberattack, with hackers trying to gain access to MPs email accounts.

The attack was blamed on Iran.

Commons data protection rules clearly state MPs should not share their passwords, even with staff members.

Her comments sparked alarm from readers and internet security experts.

Jim Killock, of the Open Rights Group, said at the time: “On…

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