Tag Archive for: experts

Russia's using ransomware groups as a bargaining chip, cyber experts warn – KCBY.com 11



Russia’s using ransomware groups as a bargaining chip, cyber experts warn  KCBY.com 11

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DVIDS – News – Army Cyber Command experts helping to lead modernization, build collective knowledge



Some of Army Cyber Command’s (ARCYBER) brightest minds are among the world-class experts leading Army modernization while building ties and collective knowledge in the military, industrial and academic communities.

Most recently, Maj. Jaison Desai, Ph.D. and Lt. Col. James Sanders of ARCYBER’s Technical Warfare Center joined colleagues from the Army Cyber Institute and the Army Artificial Intelligence Integration Center, along with more than 100 other experts from across the Department of Defense (DoD), national laboratories, Federally Funded Research and Development Centers, academia and industry who attended and made presentations at the 2021 Emerging Techniques Forum (ETF). The event was hosted by the Military Operations Research Society (MORS) in Alexandria, Va., in December 2021.

Desai and Sanders represented the Enterprise Information Technology as a Service (EITaaS) pilot program team, which falls under ARCYBER’s Network Enterprise Technology Command (NETCOM). The pair presented work created in collaboration with fellow team members Mark Southwell, Maj. Ezra McCalment and Maj. Tony Abeyta. Their presentation – “Process Innovation and Exploration of Army EITaaS Approaches” — highlighted policy, assessment and process challenges with adopting as-a-service models and how the team is navigating those areas. The presentation drew praise from numerous attendees and requests for copies and further discussion from Maj. Gen. Martin Klein, commander of the U.S. Army Reserve’s 75th Innovation Command, and U.S. Marine Corps Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Loretta Reynolds, former USMC deputy commandant for information.

“Being able to present at the MORS conferences is an amazing professional development opportunity and a great way to build connections with other members of the operations research community throughout DoD,” Desai said. “This year’s conference was particularly special because I was able to represent our ARCYBER and NETCOM team and share the progress we’ve made in areas critical to Army modernization.”

Desai’s contributions to academia…

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Experts warn against storing passwords in Chrome


Hackers are preying on people working from home for passwords stored in web browsers, experts claim.

Keeping passwords saved in the likes of Chrome and Edge are pretty common practice and usually considered quite safe.

They are designed to take the hassle out of remembering login details for every site you use.

But now IT researchers are cautioning against using such features in any browser over a recent security breach that compromised a company.

Bad actors appear to be exploiting the fact office workers in the UK and US are being forced to work from home amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

According to security experts AhnLab, an employee working remotely fell victim as they used a VPN to access their company’s network.

The person was innocently doing their job on a device shared with others they live with, unaware it was already infected with a nasty piece of info-stealing malware called Redline Stealer.

This led to sensitive account details and passwords from various sites being stolen, including information to access the company’s VPN.

Hackers then used it to login and pry on the private business data three months later.

And worse still, the computer had antivirus software installed but the malware was able to get around it.

“Although the account credentials storing feature of browsers is very convenient, as there is a risk of leakage of account credentials upon malware infection, users are recommended to refrain from using it and only use programs from clear sources,” AhnLab said.

Hackers have been reportedly been targeting people who work at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Hackers have been reportedly targeting people who work at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Redline Stealer is pretty cheap and easy to get hold of on the dark web, which means it’s hard to trace the incident back to a specific group.

It costs as little as $150 to get hold off.

The malicious tool first appeared in March 2020, right as the pandemic began to spread.

It comes amid a huge spike in scams over the course of COVID-19’s unwelcome arrival.

Millions were targeted by COVID Pass scams conning people out of money and sensitive data, while phony jabs have also been rife.

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Experts warn AGAINST storing passwords in Chrome after hackers target homeworkers


HACKERS are preying on people working from home for passwords stored in web browsers, experts claim.

Keeping passwords saved in the likes of Chrome and Edge are pretty common practice and usually considered quite safe.

A worker was unaware the computer they were using to work was already infested with malware

2

A worker was unaware the computer they were using to work was already infested with malwareCredit: Getty

They are designed to take the hassle out of remembering login details for every site you use.

But now IT researchers are cautioning against using such features in any browser over a recent security breach that compromised a company.

Bad actors appear to be exploiting the fact office workers in the UK and US are being forced to work from home amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

According to security experts AhnLab, an employee working remotely fell victim as they used a VPN to access their company’s network.

The person was innocently doing their job on a device shared with others they live with, unaware it was already infected with a nasty piece of infostealing malware called Redline Stealer.

This led to sensitive account details and passwords from various sites being stolen, including information to access the company’s VPN.

Hackers then used it to login and pry on the private business data three months later.

And worse still, the computer had antivirus software installed but the malware was able to get around it.

“Although the account credentials storing feature of browsers is very convenient, as there is a risk of leakage of account credentials upon malware infection, users are recommended to refrain from using it and only use programs from clear sources,” AhnLab said.

Redline Stealer is pretty cheap and easy to get hold of on the dark web, which means it’s hard to trace the incident back to a specific group.

It costs as little as $150/£111 to get hold off.

The malicious tool first appeared in March 2020, right as the pandemic began to spread.

It comes amid a huge spike in scams over the course of COVID-19’s unwelcome arrival.

Millions were targeted by Covid Pass scams conning people out of money and sensitive data, while phony jabs have also been rife.

The pandemic has been the perfect opportunity for hackers to exploit people stuck indoors

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The pandemic has been the perfect opportunity for hackers to exploit people stuck indoorsCredit: Alamy

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