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FBI Confirms DarkSide as Colonial Pipeline Hacker


President Biden said on Monday that the United States would “disrupt and prosecute” a criminal gang of hackers called DarkSide, which the F.B.I. formally blamed for a huge ransomware attack that has disrupted the flow of nearly half of the gasoline and jet fuel supplies to the East Coast.

The F.B.I., clearly concerned that the ransomware effort could spread, issued an emergency alert to electric utilities, gas suppliers and other pipeline operators to be on the lookout for code like the kind that locked up Colonial Pipelines, a private firm that controls the major pipeline carrying gasoline, diesel and jet fuel from the Texas Gulf Coast to New York Harbor.

The pipeline remained offline for a fourth day on Monday as a pre-emptive measure to keep the malware that infected the company’s computer networks from spreading to the control systems that run the pipeline. So far, the effects on gasoline and other energy supplies seem minimal, and Colonial said it hoped to have the pipeline running again by the end of this week.

The attack prompted emergency meetings at the White House all through the weekend, as officials tried to understand whether the episode was purely a criminal act — intended to lock up Colonial’s computer networks unless it paid a large ransom — or was the work of Russia or another state that was using the criminal group covertly.

So far, intelligence officials said, all of the indications are that it was simply an act of extortion by the group, which first began to deploy such ransomware last August and is believed to operate from Eastern Europe, possibly Russia. There was some evidence, even in the group’s own statements on Monday, that suggested the group had intended simply to extort money from the company, and was surprised that it ended up cutting off the main gasoline and jet fuel supplies for the Eastern Seaboard.

The attack exposed the remarkable vulnerability of a key conduit for energy in the United States as hackers become more brazen in taking on critical infrastructure, like electric grids, pipelines, hospitals and water treatment facilities. The city governments of Atlanta and New Orleans, and, in recent weeks, the Washington, D.C., Police…

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Watch Hacker Breaks Down Hacking Scenes From Movies & TV | Technique Critique


[piano music]

Keeps rewriting itself to counter my commands.

This has something to do with computers.

Hack ’em all.

Hi, I’m Samy Kamkar.

[Narrator] Samy is the co-founder of OpenPath Security

and a computer hacker.

I’m back to talk about more hacking scenes

in TV shows and movies.

Breaking into a government system, The X-Files.

This has something to do with computers, the internet.

Actually the ARPANET.

You can access it through the internet.

I want to believe, but this clip isn’t too realistic.

ARPANET is essentially what the internet came from.

DARPA, the U.S. government agency created ARPANET

and that bubbled into the internet

and became publicly available.

When the X-Files came out,

ARPANET was no longer in existence.

Isn’t there something you could-

I mean how do you say it, hack into?

I’m sorry, I think this is the end of the line.

How you say, that’s what she says.

She says, How you say, hack.

[Samy laughs]

How do you say it, hack into.

But How you say is what you say in other languages

when you don’t know.

Right?

[computer beeps]

What did you do?

Oh, it’s a government system,

I know a couple of logging out tricks with VMS version five.

If you’re using a password that you know,

then I don’t really consider that hacking.

[tense music]

[Woman] What is that?

It’s an encrypted file.

[computer beeps]

Why would your three year old have an encrypted file

in a secret defense department database?

Can you decode it?

There’s another issue here

in that they find a file that’s encrypted,

that by itself is not too unrealistic.

They’re showing the file in ASCII format.

Can you print it out for me?

But when you print it out,

that’s going to be useless information.

And that’s because many of the characters

that would be in an encrypted file

are not visible in an ASCII format.

So you end up with things like periods,

which may or may not be a period

or it could be a totally different character or byte.

So your ex-boyfriend is into computers.

I would totally say that.

Wait, your boyfriend’s into computers?

I should meet him.

[Samy laughs]

Locking down a system, Jurassic Park.

[computer beeps]

[tense music]

[computer beeps]

Five, four.

[door hisses]

In this clip, it looks like Newman,

you know who I mean.

Newman!

Is kind of running around,

activating or…

Source…

Watch Technique Critique | Hacker Breaks Down Hacking Scenes From Movies & TV | Wired Video | CNE | Wired.com


[piano music]

Keeps rewriting itself to counter my commands.

This has something to do with computers.

Hack ’em all.

Hi, I’m Samy Kamkar.

[Narrator] Samy is the co-founder of OpenPath Security

and a computer hacker.

I’m back to talk about more hacking scenes

in TV shows and movies.

Breaking into a government system, The X-Files.

This has something to do with computers, the internet.

Actually the ARPANET.

You can access it through the internet.

I want to believe, but this clip isn’t too realistic.

ARPANET is essentially what the internet came from.

DARPA, the U.S. government agency created ARPANET

and that bubbled into the internet

and became publicly available.

When the X-Files came out,

ARPANET was no longer in existence.

Isn’t there something you could-

I mean how do you say it, hack into?

I’m sorry, I think this is the end of the line.

How you say, that’s what she says.

She says, How you say, hack.

[Samy laughs]

How do you say it, hack into.

But How you say is what you say in other languages

when you don’t know.

Right?

[computer beeps]

What did you do?

Oh, it’s a government system,

I know a couple of logging out tricks with VMS version five.

If you’re using a password that you know,

then I don’t really consider that hacking.

[tense music]

[Woman] What is that?

It’s an encrypted file.

[computer beeps]

Why would your three year old have an encrypted file

in a secret defense department database?

Can you decode it?

There’s another issue here

in that they find a file that’s encrypted,

that by itself is not too unrealistic.

They’re showing the file in ASCII format.

Can you print it out for me?

But when you print it out,

that’s going to be useless information.

And that’s because many of the characters

that would be in an encrypted file

are not visible in an ASCII format.

So you end up with things like periods,

which may or may not be a period

or it could be a totally different character or byte.

So your ex-boyfriend is into computers.

I would totally say that.

Wait, your boyfriend’s into computers?

I should meet him.

[Samy laughs]

Locking down a system, Jurassic Park.

[computer beeps]

[tense music]

[computer beeps]

Five, four.

[door hisses]

In this clip, it looks like Newman,

you know who I mean.

Newman!

Is kind of running around,

activating or…

Source…

D.C. police computers breached by hacker, department says

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The Metropolitan Police Department appears to be the latest victim of a computer hacking group that is threatening to leak sensitive information unless the agency pays a ransom.

Screenshots on the dark web posted by the ransomware group Babuk Locker appear to show stolen MPD data on informants, gangs and officer discipline, according to documents obtained by The Washington Times.

The group claims to have downloaded more than 250 gigabytes of internal data that it will leak to gangs “to drain the informants” if the MPD does not contact them within three days.

An MPD spokesperson said Tuesday that the department is “aware of unauthorized access on our server.”

“While we determine the full impact and continue to review activity, we have engaged the FBI to fully investigate this matter,” the spokesperson said in an email. “There is no further information available to provide at this time.”

The FBI did not immediately respond to an email request for comment about the investigation.

Source…