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Venmo settings to change ASAP: Start by making your transactions private

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


Mobile payment app like Venmo and Cash App

Follow these simple steps to protect your privacy on Cash App and Venmo. 


James Martin/CNET

Tens of millions of people use mobile payment apps like PayPal’s Venmo and Square’s Cash App to transfer money directly from their bank accounts to friends, family and merchants. While these platforms offer convenience, they also bring security risks, due in part to their combination of finance and social media. Users can also be targets for hackers looking to drain financial accounts. 

But don’t worry — there are plenty of ways for you to secure your Venmo and Cash App accounts with a few simple settings changes and privacy best practices. Here’s what to do. 

Read more: Venmo’s social payments can get you into trouble. But people like them anyway

Protecting your privacy on Venmo and Cash App: Basic tips

Both payment apps use encryption and fraud detection technology to protect account information. But to better ensure your security, you should take a few extra steps.

Use a randomly generated password

We know — you’re tired of hearing about how you need to use unique, hard-to-guess passwords for every account. But it’s still true, especially when your money’s involved. One easy way to do this is to use a password manager. Our favorites — including LastPass, 1Password and Bitwarden — offer a free tier of service with all of the basics: password storage, strong and secure password generation and autofill capabilities. 

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A password manager can help keep your Venmo and Cash App accounts secure.


Angela Lang/CNET

Beware common scams

Criminals target users of apps like Venmo and PayPal in all kinds of clever ways. There have been reports of hackers posing as Venmo and Cash App support staff, calling or…

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To stop the ransomware pandemic, start with the basics

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


TWENTY YEARS ago, it might have been the plot of a trashy airport thriller. These days, it is routine. On May 7th cyber-criminals shut down the pipeline supplying almost half the oil to America’s east coast for five days. To get it flowing again, they demanded a $4.3m ransom from Colonial Pipeline Company, the owner. Days later, a similar “ransomware” assault crippled most hospitals in Ireland.

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Such attacks are evidence of an epoch of intensifying cyber-insecurity that will impinge on everyone, from tech firms to schools and armies. One threat is catastrophe: think of an air-traffic-control system or a nuclear-power plant failing. But another is harder to spot, as cybercrime impedes the digitisation of many industries, hampering a revolution that promises to raise living standards around the world.

The first attempt at ransomware was made in 1989, with a virus spread via floppy disks. Cybercrime is getting worse as more devices are connected to networks and as geopolitics becomes less stable. The West is at odds with Russia and China and several autocracies give sanctuary to cyber-bandits.

Trillions of dollars are at stake. Most people have a vague sense of narrowly avoided fiascos: from the Sony Pictures attack that roiled Hollywood in 2014, to Equifax in 2017, when the details of 147m people were stolen. The big hacks are a familiar but confusing blur: remember SoBig, or SolarWinds, or WannaCry?

A forthcoming study from London Business School (LBS) captures the trends by examining comments made to investors by 12,000 listed firms in 85 countries over two decades. Cyber-risk has more than quadrupled since 2002 and tripled since 2013. The pattern of activity has become more global and has affected a broader range of industries. Workers logging in from home during the pandemic have almost certainly added to the risks. The number of affected firms is at a record high.

Faced with this picture, it is natural to worry most about spectacular crises caused by cyber-attacks. All countries have vulnerable physical nodes such as oil pipelines, power plants and…

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Cyber Insurance Firms Start Tapping Out as …

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


A global insurance carrier refuses to write new ransomware policies in France, while insurers rewrite policies. Are we heading toward a day when ransomware incidents become uninsurable?

In early May, global insurer AXA made a landmark policy decision: The company would stop reimbursing French companies for ransomware payments to cybercriminals.

The decision, which reportedly came after French authorities questioned whether the practice had fueled the current epidemic in ransomware attacks, may be just the beginning of a general retreat that will force companies to reconsider their attempts to outsource cyber-risk to insurance firms. Already, the massive damages from one damaging crypto worm, NotPetya, caused multiple lawsuits when insurers refused to pay out on cyber-insurance claims.

AXA’s decision could signal the insurance industry agreeing that ransomware payments spur greater ransomware activity, forcing companies to deal with the direct damages of cyberattacks, said Ilia N. Kolochenko, founder and chief architect at security firm ImmuniWeb SA, in an assessment of the impact of the insurer’s decision.

“On one side, this decision will likely hinder flourishing ransomware business and indirectly incentivize would-be victims to implement better cybersecurity and enhance their cyber-resilience,” he said. “On the other side, the categorical ban will unfairly discriminate against enterprises who adequately care about their cyber defense but nonetheless fall victims to sophisticated attacks or because of their careless suppliers.”

Ransomware payments continue to be a controversial capitulation to cybercriminals. Already, governments have started pressuring companies to not pay ransomware, with the US Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) warning in October that businesses could be violating US law if they pay groups that have been put on the sanctions list. And almost two years ago, following attacks on many local governments and school districts, a group of more than 1,400 elected local mayors pledged to not pay ransomware groups.

Yet cyber insurance continues to be a popular way to mitigate risk. In the United States, direct cyber insurance premiums…

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WWE TLC 2020: How to watch, start times, full card and WWE Network

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


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WWE

After a garbage year, WWE is treating us with a promising main event: On Sunday, Drew McIntyre defends his WWE Championship against AJ Styles at the TLC pay-per-view event. It looks to be spectacular, as not only are both guys great performers, they’ll compete in a Tables, Ladders and Chairs match.

It’s one of two world championship TLC matches, as Roman Reigns will also defend his Universal Championship against Kevin Owens.

Rounding out the headlining matches is Randy Orton’s Firefly Inferno bout against “The Fiend” Bray Wyatt. Fiend matches tend to be weak, and these two had a notoriously poor WrestleMania match a few years ago (brought down by wacky Bray Wyatt theatrics. So… it’ll be interesting, at the very least. 

Start times

TLC will emanate from WWE’s ThunderDome which, after a four month residence in Orlando’s Amway Center, is now held in Florida’s Tropicana Field stadium. The main card starts both days at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT. If you’re a paid WWE Network subscriber — at $9.99 a month — you can watch TLC live for no extra cost. Otherwise, you’ll need to contact your local cable provider. 

Viewers in the UK will have to stay up late to watch Hell in a Cell; the show starts 11 p.m. Sunday UK time. Hell in a Cell starts for Australians at 11 a.m. AEDT on Monday.

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Proceed with caution…


WWE

Match card

  • WWE Championship Tables, Ladders and Chairs match: Drew McIntyre (c) vs. AJ Styles.
  • Universal Championship Tables, Ladders and Chairs match: Roman Reigns (c) vs. Kevin Owens. 
  • Firefly Inferno match: “The Fiend” Bray Wyatt vs. Randy Orton.
  • SmackDown…

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