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Ransomware is not out of control; security teams are

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


Recent headlines would make it appear as if there has been a steep rise in the number of ransomware attacks of late – but whilst there has been an increase in the number of successful campaigns, it only points to the fact that security teams have been lax in taking adequate steps to secure their network assets.

That’s the belief of Optiv Security, which goes as far as to suggest that the vast majority of companies who give in to their cyber-tormentor are victims of their own making. The company is of the opinion that most businesses find themselves in a “pay up or perish” position because of rampant cybersecurity malpractices that makes them prone to ransomware attacks. 

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FBI teams up with ‘Have I Been Pwned’ to alert Emotet victims

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


The data breach notification site now allows you to check if your login credentials may have been compromised by Emotet

The United States’ Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has shared more than 4.3 million email addresses, harvested by the Emotet botnet, with data breach tracking website Have I Been Pwned (HBIP) in an effort to help alert victims of the notorious botnet.

“In all, 4,324,770 email addresses were provided which span a wide range of countries and domains. The addresses are actually sourced from 2 separate corpuses of data obtained by the agencies during the takedown,” said HBIP founder Troy Hunt in a blog post.

The move comes on the heels of an operation on Sunday where law enforcement agencies pushed out an update to all systems compromised by Emotet in order to cleanse them of the notorious Back in January, authorities from the Netherlands, Germany, the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Lithuania, Canada, and Ukraine joined forces to disrupt the botnet by gaining control of its infrastructure and taking it down from the inside. Some 700 command-and-control servers were taken offline.

In the aftermath of the operation, the Bureau reached out to Hunt to inquire whether there was an efficient way of alerting the victims that their systems and accounts had been compromised by Emotet.

The FBI shared email login information that was stored by Emotet for spamming via victims’ email providers, along with web credentials that were harvested from browsers that were saved to speed up logins with HIBP.

While, usually, these would be treated as two separate breaches, Hunt said that they were uploaded as a single breach since “the remediation is very similar”. However, users who want to check whether they’ve been affected by Emotet won’t be able to do so using the search bar on HIBP’s homepage. This is due to the fact that the incident has been classified as sensitive by Hunt, who explained that he chose this approach so that users impacted by Emotet wouldn’t become targets.

“A sensitive data breach can only be searched…

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Mobile security that protects you everywhere



Security Researchers Band Together To Expose Hidden Flaws In Zoom & Microsoft Teams / Digital Information World

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


Vulnerabilities in the software makeup of popular video-conferencing apps Zoom and Microsoft Teams have been revealed by teams of hackers. For once, however, such an attack may not be as uninvited as usual considering all of these individuals were participating in a competition.

As part of the annual Pwn2Own competition, individuals proficient in coding and other computer security skills were put to the task of identifying potential weak points and design flaws in Zoom and Teams, as a prophylactic measure to prevent future mass hacking attacks from taking place. And what is Pwn2Own, one might venture to ask? Well, as can be surmised from the previous sentence, it’s a convention housing cybersecurity researchers and experts from across the globe, that mainly serves to address security concerns in popular applications by banding together and looking for them. Active since 2007, the Pwn2Own initiative started out in Vancouver as a response to the lack of initiative companies such as Apple were taking in beefing up their own security measures. From there on, the conference and competition has bloomed to involve a multinational audience, and has even been sponsored by the likes of Microsoft.

The sponsorships themselves are particularly of note due to the exorbitant amount of money participants win if they successfully expose weaknesses and deficits in the software presented. This year’s contestants were awarded a total sum of USD $40,000, even if it came at the expense of inciting minor paranoia in users of Zoom and Microsoft Teams. Then again, one must ponder, what were the weak links? What oversights did developers make in this process? Well, let’s get around to addressing them.

Without delving too much into technical jargon, Zoom’s safety boundaries were overcome via a third-party software developed by the participants themselves. Instead of relying on malware, however, all it took was a software appearing as a calculator to breach security. This bizarre act of ingenuity was achieved by two developers from the Netherlands-based cybersecurity firm Computest. Microsoft Teams also received sufficient attention, as multiple individuals (both independent workers and firm…

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