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University security team | About

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The team are based within the main Cottrell teaching building and have a reception at the Queens Court entrance. Support is provided on a 24/7 basis, 365 days per year. We use mobile and foot patrols coupled with the university CCTV system to identify were assistance is required.

The purpose of the security team is to allow the campus community, student, staff and visitor to operate in a safe and secure environment. To this end the team are responsible for:

  • security of students, staff, visitors and buildings
  • provision of first aid support
  • operation of the campus CCTV system
  • access to locations
  • liaison with police, fire and ambulance services
  • escorting and directing ambulances on campus
  • patrolling of campus and off campus residences
  • car parking enforcement
  • emergency procedures
  • reporting of defects to infrastructure of the campus
  • assisting with visitors to the University
  • assistance at campus events, such as graduation
  • advice on safety and security for campus users
  • single point of contact for out of hours emergencies
  • control of the campus radio system

We are here to help the campus community.

Campus CCTV

There are around 150 CCTV cameras situated throughout the campus and the off campus residences. They are operated by officers within the security control room at the Queens Court reception of the Cottrell building. The operation of the system is guided by the university CCTV policy. Only authorised persons can view the cameras and footage.

Security Control Room

The control room is staffed 24/7, 365 days per year.

The non-emergency contact for the control room is 01786 467003 from an outside line or extension 7003 internally.

The emergency contact number for the control room is 01786 467999 from a mobile or extension 2222 internally

Emergency Services Contact

Police – the university is covered by Police Scotland through its Forth Valley Division.

In a non-emergency, you can contact the police on 101. When you are asked which police service, you should say Police Scotland and you will be put through to their service centre.

You can also contact the security team and we would liaise with the Police on your behalf.

As always the emergency number for the police is 999.

Ambulance…

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Ethical Hacking & Computer Security MSc at Abertay



Protecting yourself against ransomware with advice from Prof. Faisal Akkawi of Northwestern University – WGN Radio – Chicago

Opt-in to Cyber Safety. Multiple layers of protection for your devices, online privacy and more.



Protecting yourself against ransomware with advice from Prof. Faisal Akkawi of Northwestern University  WGN Radio – Chicago

Source…

The Linux Foundation’s demands to the University of Minnesota for its bad Linux patches security project

Protect yourself from online attacks that threaten your identity, your files, your system, and your financial well-being.


To say that Linux kernel developers are livid about a pair of University of Minnesota (UMN) graduate students playing at inserting security vulnerabilities into the Linux kernel for the purposes of a research paper “On the Feasibility of Stealthily Introducing Vulnerabilities in Open-Source Software via Hypocrite Commits” is a gross understatement. 

Greg Kroah-Hartman, the Linux kernel maintainer for the stable branch and well-known for being the most generous and easy-going of the Linux kernel maintainers, exploded and banned UMN developers from working on the Linux kernel. That was because their patches had been “obviously submitted in bad faith with the intent to cause problems.” 

The researchers, Qiushi Wu and Aditya Pakki, and their graduate advisor, Kangjie Lu, an assistant professor in the UMN Computer Science & Engineering Department of the UMN then apologized for their Linux kernel blunders. 

That’s not enough. The Linux kernel developers and the Linux Foundation’s Technical Advisory Board via the Linux Foundation have asked UMN to take specific actions before their people will be allowed to contribute to Linux again. We now know what these demands are.

The letter, from Mike Dolan, the Linux Foundation’s senior VP and general manager of projects, begins:

It has come to our attention that some University of Minnesota (U of MN) researchers appear to have been experimenting on people, specifically the Linux kernel developers, without those developers’ prior knowledge or consent. This was done by proposing known-vulnerable code into the widely-used Linux kernel as part of the work “On the Feasibility of Stealthily Introducing Vulnerabilities in Open-Source Software via Hypocrite Commits”; other papers and projects may be involved as well. It appears these experiments were performed without prior review or approval by an Institutional Review Board (IRB), which is not acceptable, and an after-the-fact IRB review approved this experimentation on those who did not consent.

This is correct. Wu and Lu opened their note to the UMN IRB by stating: “We recently finished a work that studies the patching process…

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