Is your online identity protected?

The less you reveal about your location such as your IP address the more secure your connection. Take control over the information you allow to be visible on the internet.

A virtual private network (VPN) extends your private network across the Internet. It enables you to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if their computing devices were directly connected to the private network. This means you can protect your data and IP address. You can also “tunnel” around blocked sites and censorship by having a virtual presence in another country.  A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is your first line of defense on the internet.

*all VPN’s include:  Secure VPN Account – Encrypted WiFi – P2P Support – 5 devices simultaneously – Block ad-trackers, and malware – Multiple VPN Gateways – Unlimited Bandwidth – SOCKS5 Proxy Included – No traffic logs – Instant Setup – Easy to use.

Current Security News

The makers of the Mirai IoT-hijacking botnet are sentenced

The makers of the Mirai IoT-hijacking botnet are sentenced

Three men who operated and controlled the notorious Mirai botnet in October 2016 have been sentenced to five years of probation.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Graham Cluley

How to create your own Big Mac at home for less and other McDonald’s hacks to keep the family entertained

If you’re craving a Big Mac, but can’t face having to go out and get one, you can bring the taste of the golden arches to your home You can bring all the taste of the golden arches to your home. And n…
mac hacker – read more

How to create your own Big Mac at home for less and other McDonald’s hacks to keep the family entertained

If you’re craving a Big Mac, but can’t face having to go out and get one, you can bring the taste of the golden arches to your home You can bring all the taste of the golden arches to your home. And n…
mac hacker – read more

‘Peekaboo’ zero-day lets hackers view and alter surveillance camera footage

"Peekaboo" zero-day lets hackers view and alter surveillance camera footage

Hundreds of thousands of security cameras are believed to be vulnerable to a zero-day vulnerability that could allow hackers to spy on feeds and even tamper with video surveillance recordings.

Read more in my article on the Bitdefender BOX blog.

Graham Cluley

Funniest/Most Insightful Comments Of The Week At Techdirt

This week, both our winning comments on the insightful side come in response to Ajit Pai’s whining about California’s net neutrality effort — and, more specifically, in response to a commenter making the silly blanket statement that all regulation fails and governments cannot do anything right. In first place, ShadowNinja with some counterexamples:

Black and white statements like that are always wrong. There’s literally tons and tons of government programs that worked great and didn’t backfire in the long run. Here’s just a short list of what things I can think of off the top of my head that you can thank the government for, that you can’t say anything bad about how they backfired.

  • Having safe food that’s not laced with poison or other things that will make you sick.
  • Knowing that up to $ 250,000 worth of assets will the safe in the event of your bank going under thanks to FDIC insurance required by law.
  • Not having rivers and oceans that literally catch on fire because of how polluted they are with harmful chemicals/etc. that businesses dumped in them (yes, this really happened in the US).
  • Having much cleaner air because of the same environmental regulations, and not having air so polluted that people have to wear smog masks just to go outside, and some wealthy literally go on ‘clean air vacations’ where it’s less polluted (this is the reality today in China in a number of cities thanks to lack of regulation).
  • Knowing that any car you purchase has passed rigorous government safety inspections when it was designed, and any used car you purchased was inspected as well to make sure that it’s still safe to drive. Such regulations are responsible for a consistent decline in automobile accidents (which has long been the #1 killer in America).

In second place, it’s Jeremy Lyman with a similar point:

I bought a gallon of milk in the grocery store last week, and I actually got a measured gallon of the listed substance for the posted price. It also didn’t make me ill when I consumed it.

https://www.fda.gov/downloads/food/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/guidancedocuments/food labelingnutrition/foodlabelingguide/ucm265446.pdf

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/ cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=101.7

https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/Milk/default.htm

I’d wager that the government does thousands of things right in your life, it’s just transparent when it’s running smoothly.

For editor’s choice on the insightful side, we start out with one more comment from that post, this time from Anonymous Anonymous Coward and directed at one of Pai’s statements:

He know what the truth is, it just won’t fit in his mouth.

“Of course, those who demand greater government control of the Internet haven’t given up.”

Pai’s disingenuous characterization is not very subtle. In fact the demand is not for government control of the Internet, but for control over internet providers, no matter what flavor.

Control to keep the expected dumb pipes dumb. Control to encourage actual competition to keep quality high and prices low.

Control to keep those offering service honest in their advertising and billing practices.

Control to separate content from access.

Control to keep corporations from overly influencing Government in their favor rather than the owners of this country, the people.

Next, we’ve got a quick comment from Gary about an attempt to use the GDPR to hide a public US court document:

And also weird how the ISP is putting the pressure on the website. It’s almost as if there should be some law to limit intermediary liability…

Over on the funny side, our first place winner comes after we clarified what happened with the Apple movie “deletion” kerfuffle, which turned out to be about dumb regional copyright restrictions. One commenter feared they might have to give back an earlier “most insightful” award for a comment on the subject, so Anonymous Anonymous Coward checked the criteria:

Did you move to another country?

In second place, it’s one more response to the Ajit Pai post, this time from Chip in full parody mode targeting a particular commenter:

I “told” you that This would “happen”! Idiots! Sycophants! MINIONS!

I “told” you that when there were REGULATIONS, that “meant” that SOMEDAY there would be Elections, and other “people” might get “elected” and Undo the REGULATIONS. You did not Praise me for my BRILLIANCE in “understanding that Elections “exist” and sometimes different Parties get Elected, which doesn’t matter anyway because oth Parties are the “same”, as you would know if you were Interested in Truth and in “history” such as GEORGE WASHINGTON’S FAREWELL ADDRESS, which is one of Many historical Things that I have read because I am very “very” Smart.

The “regulations” in California are BAD, and the FCC’s repeal of the REGULATIONS from Wheeler is also BAD, and Wheeler’s regulations were “also” BAD. That is OBVIOUS to anyone who is very VERY “smart” like “me”. Don’t you Sycophantic “idiots” Get it? Someay in California there will be an ELECTION. And different PEOPLE might get “elected”. And those different “people” might repeal this “law”. You’re all so Stupid! Stupid! for not recognizing my obvious GENIOUS in understanding that sometimes different “people” get Elected to things. You did not learn about History like I learne about History, at Smilin’ Jim’s Unaccredited Forth Grade Academy.

Every Nation eats the Paint chips it Deseves!

For editor’s choice on the funny side, we start out with another comment from Gary, this time in response to the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce engaging in some trademark bullying over the Hollywood sign:

Hey isn’t Hollywood that obscure California city that all those film studios moved to in order to escape draconian patent lawsuits from Edison?

And finally, it’s an anonymous comment about Tanzania’s plan to outlaw the fact-checking of government statistics:

Statistics show that 100% of leaders who demonize fact-checking are honest and deserve to be reelected.

That’s all for this week, folks!

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Techdirt.

The Mirai Botnet Architects Are Now Fighting Crime With the FBI

  1. The Mirai Botnet Architects Are Now Fighting Crime With the FBI  WIRED
  2. Mirai botnet creators praised for helping FBI, won’t serve prison time  Ars Technica
  3. Mirai botnet authors avoid prison after “substantial assistance” to the FBI  ZDNet
  4. Mirai Malware Masterminds Avoid Jail Time After Helping Feds  Daily Beast
  5. Full coverage

botnet – read more

SingHealth data breach reveals several ‘inadequate’ security measures

  1. SingHealth data breach reveals several ‘inadequate’ security measures  ZDNet
  2. COI for SingHealth cyberattack: IT gaps, staff missteps contributed to incident, says Solicitor-General  Channel NewsAsia
  3. Full coverage

data breach – read more

Britain FIGHTS BACK: Cyber warfare capabilities expanded amid threat from Russia and Iran

  1. Britain FIGHTS BACK: Cyber warfare capabilities expanded amid threat from Russia and Iran  Express.co.uk
  2. Full coverage

cyber warfare news – read more

This Week In Techdirt History: September 16th – 22nd

Five Years Ago

This week in 2013, we learned that in addition to communications the NSA was keeping millions of credit card transaction records, and then we finally got a look at the secrett FISA court ruling that permitted bulk phone data collection, in which it was revealed that Verizon and AT&T never fought back. The court also made the untrue claim that all of congress already knew all the details, and of course we wondered why the ruling was ever secret to begin with. Meanwhile, Michael Hayden was making some crazy claims about terrorists using Gmail and the US’s right to spy on the internet it invented, while also making some childish prognostications about Ed Snowden’s likely future of alcoholism — though other defenders of the agency were sticking to the same tired talking points, plus the new euphemism that Snowden’s activities were “masked by his job duties”.

Ten Years Ago

This week in 2008, Apple made the decision to block a competitive podcast app from the App Store, leading to significant backlash, while a court in Germany was getting in on similar action in its own way by banning VOIP on the iPhone at the behest of T-Mobile. NBC was bragging about its ability to lock down online Olympic footage, the movie industry was making yet another attempt to build the mythical “good” DRM, and the cops were continuing to bring in the RIAA to help with investigations where it would clearly be biased. There was a glimmer of light for online entertainment though: this was also the week that BandCamp launched, and its easy-to-build pages quickly became one of the best tools for musicians to distribute their work online.

Fifteen Years Ago

This week in 2003, as file-sharers were going deeper underground, a study showed that most online copies of movies were coming from industry insiders — which perhaps explains the industry’s insane plan for self-destructing DVDs. While RIAA head Carey Sherman was struggling to defend the agency’s lawsuit strategy (and totally missing the point), the Senate was gearing up for hearings over the lawsuits, and considering a bill to close the DMCA’s special subpoena powers — also a major issue in the ongoing court battle between the RIAA and Verizon.

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Techdirt.

Android and Google Play Security Rewards Programs Surpass $3 Million in Payouts

  1. Android and Google Play Security Rewards Programs Surpass $ 3 Million in Payouts  HardOCP
  2. Google has paid over $ 3 million in payouts to help secure Android  Infosurhoy
  3. Full coverage

android security news – read more

New Virobot ransomware will also log keystrokes, add PC to a spam botnet

  1. New Virobot ransomware will also log keystrokes, add PC to a spam botnet  ZDNet
  2. New ransomware can turn your computer into a hacker’s tool  CNET
  3. Virobot Ransomware Outbreak Is Enslaving PCs In Spammy, Keylogging Botnet  Hot Hardware
  4. Full coverage

Ransomware – read more

Here’s a list of Android devices with security updates from the last 90 days (Ouch HTC)

  1. Here’s a list of Android devices with security updates from the last 90 days (Ouch HTC)  Android Authority (blog)
  2. Bug hunters fail third year in a row to get top prize in Android hacking program  ZDNet
  3. Android bug bounty tops $ 3m in third year, but pay flattens out  CSO Australia
  4. Full coverage

android security news – read more