Is your online identity protected?

The less you reveal about your location such as your IP address the more secure your connection. Take control over the information you allow to be visible on the internet.

A virtual private network (VPN) extends your private network across the Internet. It enables you to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if their computing devices were directly connected to the private network. This means you can protect your data and IP address. You can also “tunnel” around blocked sites and censorship by having a virtual presence in another country.  A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is your first line of defense on the internet.

*all VPN’s include:  Secure VPN Account – Encrypted WiFi – P2P Support – 5 devices simultaneously – Block ad-trackers, and malware – Multiple VPN Gateways – Unlimited Bandwidth – SOCKS5 Proxy Included – No traffic logs – Instant Setup – Easy to use.

Current Security News

Ships infected with ransomware, USB malware, worms – ZDNet

Ships infected with ransomware, USB malware, worms  ZDNet

Ships are the victims of cyber-security incidents more often than people think. Industry groups publish cyber-security guidelines to address issues.

“malware news” – read more

Comment: Marriott guest system hack shows the need for wider rollout of Apple Pay on the web

Apple Pay offers protection against this type of hack, because actual card details are never passed to the company. Your iPhone, Watch or Mac instead generates a one-time code which is used in …
mac hacker – read more

Supermicro says independent investigation found no spy chips on its motherboards

Supermicro says independent investigation found no spy chips on its motherboards

An independent audit has found no evidence that malicious chips were planted on Supermicro’s motherboards, debunking Bloomberg claims that servers at Amazon and Apple were being spied upon by China.

Graham Cluley

Comment: Marriott guest system hack shows the need for wider rollout of Apple Pay on the web

Apple Pay offers protection against this type of hack, because actual card details are never passed to the company. Your iPhone, Watch or Mac instead generates a one-time code which is used in …
mac hacker – read more

UK businesses feel let down by government on cyber security – ComputerWeekly.com

UK businesses feel let down by government on cyber security  ComputerWeekly.com

UK businesses are looking for greater support from the government in the battle against cyber crime, a survey of more than 500 UK senior IT professionals by …

“computer security news” – read more

Comment: Marriott guest system hack shows the need for wider rollout of Apple Pay on the web

Apple Pay offers protection against this type of hack, because actual card details are never passed to the company. Your iPhone, Watch or Mac instead generates a one-time code which is used in …
mac hacker – read more

Healthcare is the new frontier of cyberwarfare – MobiHealthNews

Healthcare is the new frontier of cyberwarfare  MobiHealthNews

Dr. Saif Abed, European Commission’s healthcare cybersecurity expert, says that further collaboration between key stakeholders in needed to protect the NHS’ …

“cyber warfare news” – read more

Chinese Hackers Are Likely Responsible For Marriott Data Breach, Reports Say – NPR

Chinese Hackers Are Likely Responsible For Marriott Data Breach, Reports Say  NPR

Chinese state hackers most likely attacked the reservation system at Marriott’s Starwood chain, revealing details of 500 million guests, according to people …

“data breach” – read more

TV, Sports & Movie Companies Still Freaking Out That EU Copyright Directive Might Include A Safe Harbor For Internet Platforms

Last week, as the last round of “trilogue” negotiations were getting underway in the EU on the EU Copyright Directive, we noted a strange thing. While tech companies and public interest groups have been speaking out loudly against Article 13, a strange “ally” also started complaining about it: a bunch of TV, movie and sports organizations started complaining that Article 13 was a bad idea. But… for very different reasons. Their concerns were that regulators had actually finally begun to understand the ridiculousness of Article 13 and had been trying to add in some “safe harbors” into the law. Specifically, the safe harbors would make it clear that if platforms followed certain specific steps to try to stop infringing works from their platform, they would avoid liability. But, according to these organizations, safe harbors of any kind are a non-starter.

Those same groups are back with a new letter that’s even more unhinged and more explicit about this. The real issue is that they recently got a ruling out of a German court that basically said platforms are already liable for any infringement, and they’re now afraid that Article 13 will “soften” that ruling by enabling safe harbors.

In a letter of 1 December we alerted the three EU institutions that the texts under discussion would undermine current case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) which already makes it clear that online content sharing service providers (OCSSPs) communicate to the public and are not eligible for the liability privilege of Article 14 E-Commerce Directive (ECD). The proposal would further muddy the waters of jurisprudence in this area in light of the pending German Federal Court of Justice (Bundesgerichtshof) referral to the CJEU in a case involving YouTube/Google and certain rightholders, addressing this very issue. The initial goal of Article 13 was to codify the existing case-law in a way that would enable right holders to better control the exploitation of their content vis a vis certain OCSSPs which currently wrongfully claim they benefit from the liability privilege of Article 14 ECD. Unfortunately, the Value Gap provision has mutated in such a way that it now creates a new liability privilege for big platforms and therefore even further strengthens the role of OCSSPs to the direct detriment of rightholders.

First of all, it is complete and utter bullshit to claim that Article 13 was “to codify existing case law.” Article 13 was designed to create an entirely brand new liability regime that deliberately sought to avoid Article 14 of the E-Commerce Directive (ECD). The ECD functions somewhat akin to the DMCA’s safe harbors in the US, in that they include intermediary liability protections for sites that comply with takedown notices in a reasonable manner. The entire point of Article 13 in the EU Copyright Directive was to take copyright out of the E-Commerce Directive and to remove those safe harbors. To claim otherwise is laughable.

It is, of course, hilarious that these companies are now pretending that just because they got a good ruling in their favor on this point, that they’re suddenly freaking out that any safe harbor might exist for internet platforms, but here they’re explicit about how against a safe harbor they are:

Last week, we proposed a balanced and sound compromise solution consisting in guidance on the issue of OCSSP liability with reference to the existing jurisprudence of the CJEU. This solution would ensure rightholder collaboration in furtherance of the deployment of appropriate and proportionate measures as well as addressing the potential liability of uploaders where the platform has concluded a license, without the creation of any new safe harbours for big platforms. We continue to believe that this reasonable approach would have broad support, including in the rightholders community and could at the same time conciliate different views of Member States and different political groups in the European Parliament, without the need to give powerful active platforms the gift of a new liability privilege which goes beyond the stated intent of the proposed copyright reform. We also indicated that if, on the contrary, any new safe harbour/”mitigation of liability” would be part of a final trilogue agreement, we want to be excluded from the entire value gap provision.

It’s also hilarious that they refer to this as “the value gap provision.” The “value gap” is a made up concept by some legacy copyright companies to complain that their business models aren’t as all powerful as they used to be, and therefore the government must step in to force other companies to give them money.

Also note the messaging here: they don’t talk about what would be best for the public. Just for “the rightsholder community.”

Anyway, if they want to be “excluded” from Article 13 entirely, I think that’s fine. The best solution here is the obvious one: the EU can drop Article 13 entirely.

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Techdirt.

Why Microsoft is fighting to stop a cyber world war – ZDNet

Why Microsoft is fighting to stop a cyber world war  ZDNet

The tech industry is becoming more vocal about its worries about a cyberwarfare arms race. But are the right people listening?

“cyber warfare news” – read more

Yet Another Large Data Breach – Are You Protected? – The Albany Herald

  1. Yet Another Large Data Breach – Are You Protected?  The Albany Herald
  2. China behind Marriott data breach, investigators conclude | TheHill  The Hill
  3. The Marriott data breach exposes a wider, potentially more nefarious cyberthreat  The Washington Post
  4. The finger has been pointed at China for Marriott data breach  ZDNet
  5. Marriott Data Breach Is Traced to Chinese Hackers as U.S. Readies Crackdown on Beijing  The New York Times
  6. View full coverage on read more

“data breach” – read more

Audit: No Chinese surveillance implants in Supermicro boards found

A letter posted by Supermicro executives today announcing that an audit had found no evidence of claims of espionage implants in the company's servers, part of a campaign by the company to counter a report by Bloomberg in October.

Enlarge / A letter posted by Supermicro executives today announcing that an audit had found no evidence of claims of espionage implants in the company’s servers, part of a campaign by the company to counter a report by Bloomberg in October.

In a letter to customers issued December 11, Supermicro President and CEO Charles Liang and other top executives announced that an audit conducted by an outside investigating team had found no evidence of any malicious hardware incorporated into motherboards currently or previously manufactured by the company. The letter is the latest rebuttal to Bloomberg reports in October that claimed tiny chips that provided a backdoor for China’s intelligence agencies had been integrated into boards provided to major Internet and cloud providers—a report also refuted by the companies the report claimed were targeted.

“After a thorough examination and a range of functional tests, the investigative firm found absolutely no evidence of malicious hardware on our motherboards,” the letter signed by Liang, Supermicro Senior Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer David Weigland, and Senior VP and Chief Product Officer Raju Penumatcha stated. “These findings were no surprise to us… We appreciate the industry support regarding this matter from many of our customers, like Apple and AWS. We are also grateful for numerous senior government officials, including representatives of the Department of Homeland Security, the director of National Intelligence, and the director of the FBI, who early on appropriately questioned the truth of the media reports.”

Reuters’ Joseph Menn reported that the audit was apparently undertaken by Nardello & Co, a global investigative firm founded by former US federal prosecutor Daniel Nardello. According to Reuters’ source, the firm examined sample motherboards that Supermicro had sold to Apple and Amazon, as well as software and design files for products. No malicious hardware was found in the audit, and no beacons or other network transmissions that would be indicative of a backdoor were detected in testing.

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Biz & IT – Ars Technica

Philip’s HealthSuite Android app poses possible security risk – MobiHealthNews

Philip’s HealthSuite Android app poses possible security risk  MobiHealthNews

Last week the Department of Homeland Security and Philips issued notices alerting the public to possible cyber security risks in Philip’s HealthSuite Health …

“android security news” – read more

Mobile Security Software: The 2018 Global Market – Tech News Watch

Mobile Security Software: The 2018 Global Market  Tech News Watch

Mobile Security Software is about the protection of smart devices from viruses, unauthorized malware access, spyware, theft of data and hacker attacks. Also …

“mobile security news” – read more

Google Smart Lock: The complete guide – Computerworld

Google Smart Lock: The complete guide  Computerworld

Think fast: How many times a day do you pick up your phone to look at something? Unless you live in the tundra or have far more self-control than most, the …

“android security news” – read more

Android malware steals money from PayPal accounts while users watch helpless – ZDNet

  1. Android malware steals money from PayPal accounts while users watch helpless  ZDNet
  2. The latest Android security threat is nothing to worry about  androidandme.com
  3. Android Trojan steals money from PayPal accounts even with 2FA on  We Live Security
  4. Fake PayPal Scam Tries to Rob You of $ 1,000  Tom’s Guide
  5. View full coverage on read more

“android security news” – read more

Key flaws in Android security and how to protect against them – Techaeris

  1. Key flaws in Android security and how to protect against them  Techaeris
  2. Android click fraud apps mimic Apple iPhones to boost revenue  Naked Security
  3. Android adware tricks ad networks into thinking it’s an iPhone to make more money  ZDNet
  4. How The Times Analyzed Location Tracking Companies  The New York Times
  5. Here’s how to limit app location tracking on iPhones and Android devices  Fast Company
  6. View full coverage on read more

“android security news” – read more

Samsung Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+ receiving December security patch – BGR India

Samsung Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+ receiving December security patch  BGR India

Samsung has reportedly started pushing out December security patch to Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+ smartphones. The Android firmware update bumps up the …

“android security news” – read more