Posts

Mindef, SUTD sign agreement to build defences against cyber attacks, Singapore News & Top Stories

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


SINGAPORE – With the growing threat of cyberattacks on critical infrastructure, the Ministry of Defence (Mindef) is seeking to tighten its defences by further training its experts and studying the methods employed by hackers.

It is doing so through a partnership with the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) to strengthen collaboration in several areas, including research and technology, threat modelling and training, Mindef said on Thursday (Sept 16).

A memorandum of understanding on operational technology security for critical infrastructure was signed by Defence Cyber Chief Brigadier-General (BG) Mark Tan and SUTD Associate Provost for Research and International Relations Yeo Kiat Seng.

The signing took place at the university on the sidelines of a two-week cybersecurity exercise co-organised by the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) and SUTD, called the Critical Infrastructure Security Showdown.

Mindef said that recent cyberattacks on critical infrastructure, such as fuel pipelines and power distribution systems, are “stark reminders of the increasingly sophisticated cyber threats that countries face”.

“The MOU underscores Mindef’s and the Singapore Armed Forces’ commitment to build up cybersecurity expertise and capabilities against potential operational technology cyber threats.”

Operational technology (OT) systems include computer systems designed to be deployed in critical infrastructure, such as power, water, manufacturing and similar industries.

Such infrastructure overseas has been hit by hackers recently. Colonial Pipeline, which supplies about 45 per cent of fuel used on the east coast of the United States, was hit by a ransomware attack in May.

That same month, a cyberattack on Brazilian food giant JBS forced the closure of all its beef plants in the US.

OT infrastructure and enhancements have been used in projects such as energy-efficient buildings and the Republic of Singapore Air Force’s Smart Airbase, said Mindef.

The agreement is expected to cement collaboration between Mindef and the SAF and the SUTD iTrust Centre for Research in Cyber Security in several areas.

The iTrust centre will allow Mindef to test cyber defence measures and better…

Source…

Powerful botnet found to be launching some of the biggest DDoS attacks ever

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


Some of the most powerful DDoS attacks ever detected have been revealed by cybersecurity company StormWall.

This specific botnet, which enabled DDoS attacks of up to 2TB/s, sets a new record over the entire life of the internet as we know it so far.

Source…

Employee Cyber Security Training Is Vital To Reduce Attacks

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


Promotion

Cyber crime is having a truly major impact on the global economy and over 40% of business has reported cyber-attacks or data breach in the past year. And the global economy lost over $1 Trillion from cyber-crime, often because employee mistakes in 2020, making cyber security training for all employees now vital for all organisations.

As cyber crime becomes more lucrative, cyber attacks are more likely to occur. It’s important to understand the short-term and long-term effects cyber attacks could have on your business.

Cyber hacking attacks have become the new criminal norm and all organisations are under threat and often they are unaware of the initial criminal integration into their systems.

Most cyber crimes are carried out in order to generate profit for the cyber criminals, some cyber crimes are carried out against computers or devices directly to damage or disable them, while others use computers or networks to spread malware, illegal information, images or other materials. 

These attacks cover all industries, commerce and care organisations.

Cyber crime costs billions of pounds, causes untold damage, and threatens commercial and national security.
Cyber criminals seek to exploit human or security vulnerabilities in order to steal passwords, data or money directly. 

The most common cyber threats include:

Phishing – bogus emails that look valid ask employees for security information, commercial and personal details. 
The victim will either download an attachment that contains malware, or they’ll click a link and hand over sensitive information, such as their login credentials or financial information.

Hacking – including organisations, social media and email passwords.

Malicious Software – including ransomware through which criminals hijack files and hold them to ransom.

Distributed Denial of Service (DDOS) attacks – against websites, which is often accompanied by extortion. 

Ransomware Malicious Software (RMS) – takes control of a business’ computer system and blocks the user’s access. The system remains locked until payments have been made to the cyber criminal.

Cyber Attack Prevention

Most cyber attacks could be prevented by taking…

Source…

The Best Way to Stop Ransomware Attacks: Be Proactive, Not Reactive

T-Mobile is Warning that a data breach has exposed the names, date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license/ID information of more than 40 million current, former or prospective customers who applied for credit with the company. Get Secured Now with Norton 360


Whenever the Justice Department has confronted a new and sophisticated criminal threat, it has focused its resources on proactive rather than reactive investigations and reorganized itself accordingly. That’s how the department confronted organized crime in the 1960s, and terrorists after Sept. 11. And that is how the department should confront ransomware today.

Reactive investigations start with a known crime and try to find the culprit. Proactive investigations, by contrast, start with known or suspected criminals and seek proof of specific crimes they may have committed, as well as intelligence on the criminal apparatus that supports them, such as who supplies them with necessary tools and contraband, how they communicate and how they move their money.

Source…