How London become 2021’s hub for hot new tech IPOs – Fortune

Protect yourself from online attacks that threaten your identity, your files, your system, and your financial well-being.



How London become 2021’s hub for hot new tech IPOs  Fortune

Source…

5 smartphone security fixes to keep your data safe from hackers, scammers and advertisers

Protect yourself from online attacks that threaten your identity, your files, your system, and your financial well-being.


Go anywhere online and it feels like someone is watching. That’s because, well, they are.

Tips to keep your laptop, tablet and smartphone safe while traveling this summer

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Did you know there’s a secret mobile advertiser ID on your smartphone that knows where you live and what you’ve shopped for online recently? It can easily be traced directly to you and reveals things like your physical address and IP address.



a sign above a store: Public charging stations at places like airports and coffee shops are handy but they also put your data at risk.


© Wittayayut/Getty Images/iStockphoto
Public charging stations at places like airports and coffee shops are handy but they also put your data at risk.

And that’s just one of many trackers, IDs, maps, and settings collecting your info. More often than not, this data is packaged up and sold to the highest bidder. (Sorry, you don’t get a cut.)

Loading...

Load Error

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

If you want to get serious about security, you’ll have to go beyond the usual steps.

1. Turn on USB restricted mode

Ever charge your Apple device in a public place, on a plane or at work? You need to turn on USB restricted mode. It helps to prevent hackers from “juice jacking” your device by installing malware or stealing information through the USB charging port.

How to do it: To turn on USB Restricted Mode, select Settings > Face ID & Passcode > type in your passcode. Scroll down to the section called “Allow Access When Locked,” and make sure the option called “USB Accessories” is toggled off.

Public charging stations at places like airports and coffee shops are handy but they also put your data at risk. If you’re going to be out long enough for your device to run out of power, consider getting your own external power bank and juicing it before leaving your home. If you must use a public charging station, think about picking up a USB data blocker that stops malware from entering your device or bring along your own external battery charger.

2. Auto-erase data

Source…

The University Of Tulsa To Offer Cybersecurity Program

Protect yourself from online attacks that threaten your identity, your files, your system, and your financial well-being.


This announcement could not be more timely with all the cyber attacks seen on cities and businesses lately.

The University of Tulsa is adding a new School of Cyber Studies.

Thanks to the new program, students can now get a bachelor’s degree in Cyber Security and a doctorate in Cyber Studies.

TU professor Tyler Moore says it was an easy decision because of the high demand for cyber security jobs across the country.

“To see where we’ve come from then to now, has been pretty inspiring to think that we can have an entire department dedicated to cyber studies,” Moore said.

Moore says there are at least 200,000 cybersecurity job openings right now that businesses are hoping to fill.

TU student Jess Peraza says she jumped at the chance to major in something she is passionate about.

“Cybersecurity is like a booming field right now and a lot of computer scientists are choosing this as their niche so I think it will bring more people in,” Peraza said.

Moore says cybersecurity is comprised of the best TU has to offer. He says labs with servers like these are going to give students the hands-on experience they need to be ready right out of college.

“That’s what’s exciting is that we can really hopefully meet the demand that’s out there for cyber programs that…..we maybe couldn’t have done before,” Moore said.

Moore says some of his best memories when he was a TU student was thanks to the hands-on education, he was getting…and now, more than 20 years later, he hopes to do the same with the next generation of students.

“The reason why I wanted to come back and teach a few years ago was because of the great experience I had as a student, because I got the chance to do hands-on cybersecurity work as a student even then,” Moore said.

Source…

Small firms are big targets for hackers: Engage

Protect yourself from online attacks that threaten your identity, your files, your system, and your financial well-being.


While big cybersecurity events dominate the news — most recently the Colonial Pipeline and JBS breaches — cybercriminals are also targeting smaller businesses, and small to midsized accounting firms need to be aware of how to protect themselves.

Cybercriminals often use social engineering to get into systems. These phishing attacks can take the form of bogus emails from “colleagues” enticing users to pass along sensitive information, or hand over passwords.

One of the most important things firms can do to avoid becoming the target of a breach is employee training, said Roman Kepczyk, director of firm technology strategy for Right Networks, during a session at the AICPA Engage 2021 conference this week in Las Vegas.

“What I see at firms when discussing these threats, sometimes, is partners and staff just roll their eyes — it’s led to what we call breach fatigue,” he said during his session at the conference. “And so what I encourage my firms to do is random pop-up training and sessions, which can be done with products like KnowBe4, a phishing testing company that does random spot testing and training on different cyber topics so awareness remains top of mind.”

The stresses, confusion and workplace changes related to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have naturally led to spikes in cybercrime, because companies and individuals are desperate, tired, and therefore easy targets to be tricked. Other high-spike times are holidays, like Christmas or Thanksgiving, for the same reasons.

Even though it seems simple, staying on top of the little things can make a significant difference to data safety at a firm, Kepczyk explained. Make sure staff don’t stick passwords onto their laptops, or leave their computer programs or even office doors propped open, for example. He warned against stepping away from your screen even for a minute without locking it, recounting a case where firm staff got emails from the managing partner telling them not to come in the following week — which turned out to be a prank from someone who had come in after hours and noticed the managing partner’s computer had been left open.

“We also recommend that you reboot your computer daily,” he said. “At…

Source…